Quel Pedra (That Stone)

PHOTOBOOK BY PAULIANA VALENTE PIMENTEL


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

51 photographs
86 pages
29.7×21 cm
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There is a legend in Mindelo, in the island of São Vicente, which says that those who sit on a specific stone in the neighborhood of Font Flip, will became gay. It was in this neighborhood that I met Steffy and seven of his friends: Edinha, Gi, Elton, Sindji, Susy, Henio and Jason. These boys, aged between seventeen and twenty-five years are transgender, in as much that they like to wear women`s clothing, make up, and to be called by women’s names. Faced by this specific situation in Cape Verde, and the significance of this stone, I decided to entitle this work “Quel Pedra”, which is Creole for “That Stone”.

There is a high degree of intolerance towards homosexuals in many African countries, in some cases motivated by religious beliefs, others out of ignorance. Many Africans are forced to immigrate to Europe due to their inability to live their sexuality freely. Sexual relations between persons of the same sex were only legalized in 2004 in Cape Verde. Until then, it was a crime to have a homosexual relationship. In twelve years, the law has changed, but the discrimination persists. In 2013, a year before I met this group of friends, the first Gay Parade was held in Mindelo.

Given these facts, I was interested in living in this community, in order to understand their dreams, frustrations, hopes and fears. Where their courage and attitude came from. I was with them in two separate moments; one in late 2014 and in March 2016. It was interesting to see how much has changed in the lives of these Cape Verdian youngsters, and in what manner.

The idea of this work is to confront the viewer with their own prejudices, challenging the conventions and standards concerning the identity of the human being. Simone de Beauvoir once said: “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman”, perhaps the aim of this work is to unveil what it means to be woman today.

 

PAULIANA VALENTE PIMENTEL

Pauliana Valente Pimentel was born in Lisbon in 1975, the city where she still lives but she is working all around the world. As an artist and a freelance photographer she has been producing photo reportages since 1999 for various Portuguese and foreign magazines and newspapers.

In 2005 she took part in the photography course of the Gulbenkian Creativity and Artistic Creation Program. She was member of the Kameraphoto collective from 2006 until its extinction in 2014, and a founding member of the N’WE collective in 2016. Besides her participation in collectively authored books, she produced her own first book “VOL I” in 2009, published by Pierre Von Kleist and “Caucase, Souvenirs de Voyage” in 2011 by Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.

Filmography: “Diz-se que Portugal é um bom país para se viver”, 40 min, Portugal 2011; “Jovens de Atenas / Youth of Athens”, 13 min. Athens, Greece, 2012; “Entre Nous”, 51 min. Portugal, France, 2014.

In 2015 she won the prize for the best photographic work of the year by the Portuguese Author Society and in 2016 she was nominee for the Novo Banco prize, the most important prize in Portugal for contemporary photography. She did already several exhibitions in Europe – Portugal, Spain, Italy, England, Germany, Greece, but also outside such as EUA, Turkey, China and Africa (Morocco, and Cape Vert). She was represented for five years by Galeria 3+1 Arte Contemporanea in Chiado and seven years by Galeria das Salgadeiras, in Lisbon. Nowadays she collaborates with several galleries in Europe and part of her work belongs to private and institutional collections.

PAULIANAVALENTEPIMENTEL.COM

 

 

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Made of the Sun

PHOTOBOOK BY MICHELE VITTORI


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

45 photographs
72 pages
29.7×21 cm
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Euro €28.50

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A SICILIAN PARADOX

Sicily… an island where families sit in circles on their doorsteps, intently relying stories of their dreams and misfortunes. An island where even the sandstone remains mute and dull, refusing to give up the deepest of her secrets. She is an island full of shadows, knowing no peace… with light so intensely blinding it simultaneously pulls us in and pushes us away like an absurd paradox; life and death together.

Here is Sicily, where children catch fish with their hands and women walk about in mourning dresses, where dusty paper Madonnas and Saints peer out from the windows, symbolizing memories of a time gone by.

On the way to San Vito lo Capo, near Trapani, is a chapel dedicated to Saint Crescenzia. Legend tells of landslides that occurred as punishments for conversions that never happened. But just as a landslide was about to overwhelm the chapel, it halted, thus removing Fear. Even today, faithful followers honor the tradition of throwing stones into the chapel to exorcise ‘U Scantu, the Fear!

Sicily… with a district named Landslide; and valleys named Hanged Man, Peak of the Devil, and even Demon Valley; where in Palermo you can stroll down Death Lane.

Michele’s pictures move in this moonlight panorama as his steps lighten and become faster. They move in the tracks of cattle, in old abandoned factories, in places once swarming with life, today small silent worlds.

Anchoring the so called modern progressive cities is senseless violence. Real growth never came to Sicily and without growth there is no progress. And so this complex island continues to live in exile, compared to the rest of the nation. For this, everyone shares in the guilt. The perception is one of exile, with the sea an insuperable barrier, instead of the guardian of future promise. In this walls-era the sea is the supreme king. The diaspora of migrants come from the sea, and from the sea people leave their homes to look for a better life.

Sicily… a land of paradox, where some arrive searching for luck and others run away because of bad luck.

Where is the human being in Michele’s pictures?

You perceive his smell, feel his presence, perhaps behind windows of lowly houses on any street in any country, perhaps with an inane program blaring from the TV, or resting among the cool damp walls at midday. Old crocks and Vespas on the edge of a road, roulottes in the desert…

Michele seems to arrive a moment later, when everything has already happened. This makes his images magnetic, what has not been said.

Francesco Faraci
November 2017

 

MICHELE VITTORI

Born and living in Rome area, Michele Vittori starting from visual arts passion approached the photography in 2008 by attending technical courses at the “Graffiti” school and workshop at “Officine Fotografiche” in Rome. Throughout the early works he found a special attraction in the landscape photography documentation, that has led him to produce various photographic series related to the territory. Since 2015 he take part as contributor at “Limine” collective, by through his photographic series called “La montagna di Roma” . The project developed under the supervision of Massimo Siragusa, has been presented at “Officine Fotografiche” and is published in limited edition. Since 2017 he take part as contributor at “Lo stato delle Cose”, a project to document the earthquake of 2016 in the center Italy.

MICHELEVITTORI.COM

 

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Connecting Flows

PHOTOBOOK BY DOMINA APOSTOLIDOU


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

69 photographs
104 pages
21×29.7 cm
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Euro €34.50

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When I started taking these pictures about 2 years ago, I did not have a specific project in mind. I just tried to capture things that felt relevant to me in some way. As time has passed this body of work feels more coherent to my eyes. The notion of a “natural flow”, of an inner connection with the world, that I experience whilst making photographs, seems to be expressed in my pictures as well. Although the subjects are various and the places are different, I seem to always look for the same inner space, where these feelings are present. This is why I call this body of work “Connecting Flows”. For me, the place where these natural flows connect is a place where magic happens.

I see a lot of photography and sincerely enjoy the work of many photographers, but my influences can come from any kind of art, nature or from other people. A look, a real moment with someone you know or don’t know, this precious intimacy… it can all be very influential to me. Being open to life. That is what motivates my work.

 

DOMINA APOSTOLIDOU

I was born in 1975 in Greece. I have studied civil engineering, and I work as an engineer. Photography entered my life in 2011. Since then, not a day has passed without photographs, in one way or another. I love stories, I love pictures.

DOMINAAPOSTOLIDOU.COM

 

 

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The World Knows Us, Because We Kill Lions

PHOTOBOOK BY ADRIEN BLONDEL


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

40 photographs
72 pages
21×29.7 cm
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The Last Maasais

When out of their territories, Maasais identify each other through little details on the person, often times a bead bracelet or a missing front tooth. These serve as a form of identification, and can be seen as a beacon in a country where they find themselves the minority and see their land ownership being more and more contested.

Namuncha is a Maasai community in Kenya, it is located at the edge of the Maasai territory, and its members sometimes refer to themselves as the last Maasais. This little joke has a bitter sweet taste, bearing the ominous prophecy of their disappearance, the relegation of their traditions to something solely picturesque.

I first spent some time in Namuncha eight years ago, to provide images to serve for their increasing desire to welcome tourists in the community and participate in the country’s first economy. I gathered some footage and photographs. I went back in 2016 with the purpose to create a multimedia project including a feature length documentary and a photographic story. The aim of this project is to provide representation for the ordinary, the everyday, among a radically different culture, culture that is known in the world for its colorful and exotic traditions.

My project deals with the mundanities of Maasai life, with a culture that is shaped around their own concept of time. They are a chanting people living a quiet life, a fleeting culture under the pressure of globalization. The apparent peacefulness bears the presence of a struggle, a struggle rooted in history, culture and economics, a silent ongoing threat.

 

ADRIEN BLONDEL

Adrien Blondel was born and grew up in Normandy, France. He moved to Paris where he studied and graduated in history of cinema and cinematography. His first feature documentary film project brought him to the US, where he came back to live in San Francisco. Adrien works as a lighting technician and a camera operator for the film industry. He recently finished the shooting of his second feature documentary, set in a Maasai community in Kenya.

In search for more creative output than his work provides, Adrien started developing his photography practice a few years ago. His work is highly influenced by the experience of living abroad, and deals with memory, the notion of home and a cultural view of his surroundings.

ADRIENBLONDELPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

 

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Wuhan Boulevard

PHOTOBOOK BY ALESSANDRO ZANONI


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

36 photographs
86 pages
29.7×21 cm
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Wuhan Boulevard is an invitation to a journey through a city in progress where time stands still. A journey through an elevated urban railway located in the capital of Hubei province traversed by the Yangtze River: Wuhan. Consciously or unconsciously, deliberately or unthinkingly, the focus on a specific mode of transportation is of particular interest. Wuhan is indeed a major transport and logistic hub connecting key provinces in China, notably thanks to its port. Yet the usual watery landscapes that surround the city are not the focal point of this visual journey. Wuhan Boulevard is in truth one of the stops of the metro line one Zanoni has used to travel across the city. Immediately struck by this appellation, the artist chooses it while thumbing his nose at the fantasy about the Western famous boulevards, such as the Sunset Boulevard: the legendary route to fame and success in Los Angeles. But here the glamour and the density have turned into a rather unsettling and abandoned urban environment. Here we embark on a train that leads to an infinite landscape made of concrete and empty skyscrapers, an endless road towards unceasing urbanization.

Wuhan Boulevard seizes non-places, in other words transitional spaces which are supposed to be crossed. Probing into social commentary, the series reifies the notion of unqualified city. It allows us to look behind giant advertising panels, unveiling a dreamt city struggling to be completed, a city made of brand-new skycrapers that cohabit with old crumbling housing, a city built to welcome more inhabitants while excluding others. In fact Wuhan is the most populous city in Central China, but it seems its inhabitants have been discarded from these photographs. Where are the people? Only a lone wanderer here and there, or some cloths hung outside testify to the human presence. What is left of their houses then? Are they under construction or being knocked down? Zanoni’s pictures unveil an anxiety about modernization. A sense of dehumanization, of alienation, while enhancing at the same time local attempts to take over these non-places.

Zanoni does not only document what contemporary Chinese metropolises are made of today. He embraces the role of the urban flâneur by exploring the ways in which inhabitants can move or are prevented from moving across their environment. Zanoni climbs up the ground hills, cuts across rubbish mounds, wanders around forbidden construction areas, while gazing from above on the elevated railway. As an attempt to depict a city on the move populated with people on the move, these photographs reinforce the fact that paths are alternatively opened and obstructed.

In sum Wuhan Boulevard intertwines the notions of order with disorder, hope with disillusion, leftover past with uncertain future. It caught a glimpse of Chinese urban life as the train is passing by.

Marine Cabos
Art historian – Photography of China

 

ALESSANDRO ZANONI

He’s a visual designer and photographer based in Milan, Italy. After attending Fine Art School and taking courses in illustration at the European Design Institute of Milan, he began his profession as a graphic designer, first in the field of printing and publishing and subsequently in web and interaction design. A devourer of music he worked for a decade writing reviews for the influential rock magazine Jam. He recently began his approach to photography obtaining important awards at the IPA’s and Sony World Photography Awards. He have exhibited in both solo and group shows in Milan, Naples Paris and New York. A tireless metropolitan traveler, his work is focused on finding unusual and urban wastelands: the quest of human footprint in the anthropocene era captured through the lens of his sleek yet detached gaze.

ALESSANDROZANONI.COM

 

 

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No Man’s Land

PHOTOBOOK BY FRANCO SORTINI


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

38 photographs
64 pages
29.7×21 cm
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The no man’s land is a portion of land not occupied or claimed by several parties that leave that area not occupied due to fears or uncertainties that would result to take possession. The term was originally used to define a contested territory or a dumping ground for waste positioned between two feuds. It’s used primarily to describe, in the first world war, the area situated between two enemy trenches that neither of two fighters wanted to take for fear of being attacked by the enemy during the action, with this sense the term was coined in the English language no man’s land.

All around the big cities have been developed the new urban settlements, to welcome those who moved from the countryside. The large suburbs many times have become even larger than the city itself, while remaining outside the city center, and reduced to sleeping quarters. Most often lack the most basic social services. We live in an almost deserted city where the need for a place to live is most important than the right to have a better life. Francesco Erbani in his book “Rome: The Decline of the Public City”, he asks: “are we sure that the transformations that are taking place are necessary to meet to collective needs of Rome? or are, however, the effect of real estate strategies that give prestige and money to private and downloading charges on the public and don’t carrying a very helpful to the city?” .In fact, the suburbs have no reason to exist if within them not are provided, in addition to residences, services, commercial and management activities, offices and part of those of the public office who can no longer stay in the central areas of a city. These large suburbs, however, look very much like “no man’s land” means an area of border between the city as a place of life, exchange of social relationships, entertainment, culture and the countryside, no longer as a productive place but as a abandoned space.

 

FRANCO SORTINI

Franco Sortini (1958) is an Italian photographer. Beginning in the 1980s, under the supervision of Franco Fontana, has produced color photographs of landscape and architecture. His photographs are presented with a deadpan wit and always considering the tenuous balance between people and their surroundings. He works in series, photographing urban scenes of his native Italy and Europe. His use of color has been lauded for its capacity to express reality and the mediterranean light.

His work has featured in many galleries in Europe and his photographs are in the collections of Bibliotheque Nationale de France in Paris, the AFOCO Archive in Cordoba, the Galleria Civica of Modena, the Department of Modern Art of University of Siena and in many private collections.

He has published several photography book and some artist’s book in limited editions. His photographs also have been published in many magazines and web magazines.

Professional photographer since 1986, he is a member of the Italian Association of Professional Photographers.

Currently he lives in Salerno (Italy).

FRANCOSORTINI.EU

 

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So Far Away, Yet So Close

PHOTOBOOK BY BAPTISTE DE VILLE D’AVRAY


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

45 photographs
70 pages
29.7×21 cm
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The project “So Far Away, Yet So Close” brings together 7 years of exploration on a real territory, during a boom in urban development – a place that is resolutely contemporary and yet photographed in a timeless manner.

Baptiste de Ville d’Avray originally approached Morocco during regular short visits.

He was soon attracted by its unique Atlantic atmosphere and its coastline spanning thousands of kilometres, between the Algerian and Mauritanian borders. This country became a character in its own right within Baptiste de Ville d’Avray’s world. He was to revisit and chisel away at this material, honing a land that springs from his imagination. He thus transforms slices of life and atmospheres into stories with his camera. The lighting is always soft. The characters are like silent actors, appearing to perform in a set invented by and for the photographer.

In 2009, he began the series “Mediterrannea Saidia”, focusing on the “Plan Azur” project, with the scheduled creation of six seaside resorts. This series features the concrete sprawl over the coastline, through architecture and landscapes whose residents appear lost. Shortly after the events that shook the Arab countries, he continued his work on the coast with the series “Witnesses on the Horizon” [A L’horizon les Témoins]. These photographs capture a latent expectation in the air, at once calm yet full of tension, which can be found in many Mediterranean countries. Facing the sea, the witnesses wander. They pause, impassive. With their eyes turned to the future, they seem to deny themselves the right to dream.

In 2012, he moved to Morocco and began a contemplative photographic fiction compiled over the course of his travels and encounters, with “So Far Away, Yet So Close” [L’apparition d’Un Lointain si Proche]. This was the starting point for playing on the fringes of his practice, by moving away from a more documentary and serial approach. In each photo, time appears to slow down, with each of the titles reconstituting the pieces of a puzzle to form a fable.

He later embarked on a nomadic photography project “The Coast, Another Border” [Le Littoral, Une Autre Frontière], which follows the Moroccan side of the Mediterranean bypass that was never completed, originally intended to link up two countries, Algeria and Morocco. In a cinematographic style, the author reveals the radical transformations of the landscape.

Living between two continents, and flying many times over the Atlantic, he began Postcard from Morocco in 2016: a kind of visual and imaginary correspondence. In this series, he presents suspended moments devoid of exoticism.

 

BAPTISTE DE VILLE D’AVRAY

Baptiste de Ville d’Avray’s photography is orientated towards a cinematographic, latent and contemplative vision of the landscape and portraiture. Since 2009, he has been working on a project based on the transformations of Mediterranean landscapes, particularly in Morocco. His images seek to construct mini photographic fictions based on a real territory that becomes a character in its own right and on anodyne moments from daily life, by flirting with the boundaries of documentary photography and poetry. They express the contradiction between a perpetual movement and the immobility of bodies, thus presenting an X-ray view of the inner workings of a country and its inhabitants.

BAPTISTE-DVA.FR

 

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Following Cornelius

PHOTOBOOK BY MITCH KARUNARATNE

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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

33 photographs
64 pages
21×29.7 cm
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Euro €24.50

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I come from Canvey Island, a small island in the Thames Estuary, 40km east of London. Despite the complex web of dykes and drains built to secure the land by the Dutch engineer Cornelius Vermuyden, in 1621, the land sinks slowly into the mud. Growing up, his name was memoralised everywhere – in my school’s name, in the street names, in shop names – he was the island’s hero.

I was curious to see where Cornelius went after leaving Canvey – so I followed his route from Canvey Island, 100 miles north to the Fens in East Anglia. The Fens, reclaimed from the sea, are still dry as well, thanks to Cornelius Vermuyden. Under every foot of land there are tunnels, drains, pumps, reservoirs, channels, sluices, gulley’s, cuts and embankments that pump, move and drain water continuously to ensure this land remains dry. 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the tides, farm run-off, water usage, rainfall and ground water are monitored, rationed and controlled to keep everything in balance.

Despite now being almost three metres below sea level, the battle goes on to keep this land dry. Whilst it looks on the surface to be an agriculturally rich, rural, natural landscape – it’s the most intensely managed land in the country.

 

MITCH KARUNARATNE

Mitch Karunaratne is attracted to places that hold stories in the land, where the land shapes and helps give us a sense of identity and belonging. She received a MA in Photography from University of Brighton in 2012. She has exhibited widely both in the UK and abroad, most recently in Norway and Italy. She is a founding member of the MAP6 collective – travelling and creating collaborative projects with the group.

MITCHKARUNARATNE.COM

 

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6m²

PHOTOBOOK BY MÉLANIE DESRIAUX

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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

50 photographs
82 pages
21×21 cm
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Euro €29.50

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Mélanie Desriaux observes Man and the vernacular; otherness. Especially, the wild as a conquest of the real. Her work bears reference to that particular history which links photography and exploration. She suggests that, in an age where everything has been charted, every frontier has been crossed, the only discovery left is inside the image itself. Going towards unknown, crossing borders, to find a visible limit and increase a point a view, are her goals. Then, she begins stories, she documents within an elliptical shape.

Her approach is contemplative. She looks intensively to find into the world an image – images – of what she feels into herself. Taking the road it’s looking for the wild, it’s changing landmarks and customs, it’s re-evaluating perceptions, it’s facing one’s fear to reveal the outlines of what limits us. So, the expedition raises metaphysical stakes, political and environmental reflections, and the journey takes on an unexpected thickness.

On Ré island, there is the detention center where are incarcereted the longest sentences of France. In Saint-Martin, one cell is equal to 6m². However, some of them express strongly realities of life – dreamed or lived – and the prison reality. Inside this floating zone, each object, each image, tries to drown walls. Photography is trying to put off boundaries of the document. So, to take the road on this territory of exile is to measure the meaning of penitence. The photographic work becomes the place of an interrogation on manufacturing process; a passage from the document to fiction. On one side as on the other – on the wire – each gesture defines a link to reality and the way in wich Man inhabits the real.

 

MÉLANIE DESRIAUX

Born in 1981 in La Rochelle, Mélanie Desriaux lives and works in France. She graduated from the School of Fine Arts (Rennes, France, 2006), and obtained Higher Competitive Exam in Education, in the Visual Arts, with Photography as a major subject (Aix-en-Provence, France, 2010). Ever since, she has shared her work between artistic orders, teaching and personal research. She also works in the editorial design of artists books. Mélanie Desriaux shows her work in France and abroad.

From 2006 to 2012, she exhibited her work at Le Radar Gallery (Bayeux, France), Art & Essai Gallery (University of Rennes 2, France), and the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil. Her work in the prison of Saint-Martin (Ré island, France) was selected by Carceropolis, along Jane Evelyne Atwood’s work for instance. It is regularly published by the Prison International Observatory, and used by production company as Phare Ouest for instance.

In 2015, she won a scholarship for a wandering photographic tour in The United States. Her point of view of the Oregon trail earned her the first Fisheye magazine Jury Prize, handed over by Theo Gosselin and Maud Chalard. In 2016, she was selected by Pascal Amoyel to exhibit this work in Bowen Island (Vancouver, Canada) for FotoFilmic / PULP Gallery & Store. Also, she has been part of the David Stewart’s selection among 20 finalists for Youthhood, Life Framer Photography Prize. Her works was published by C41 magazine for instance.

In 2017, Mélanie Desriaux will show pictures produced with Observatory of Paris (France), for the 350 years of the site.

MELANIEDESRIAUX.NET

 

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Twentysix Abandoned Catalan Gasoline Stations

PHOTOBOOK BY XAVIER ARAGONÈS



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2017 / 1st 210mm edition
Limited of 50

26 photographs
60 pages
210×210 mm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €23.50

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[click cover to preview photobook]

2017 / 1st 294mm edition
Limited of 50

26 photographs
60 pages
294×294 mm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €43.00

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You know, gasoline stations always bring life to small towns. You’d always have someone pumping the gas, buying things at the shop or just stopping by to say hello and have a little chat with the employees.

But at some point the farmers’ co-op decided to build their own station so they could get cheaper fuel and from then things went downhill. I could not compete with their prices at all. In the end, the guys from the oil company came here and stripped all the place down and now I’m left with the remains.

According to the law, I’m not allowed to use this place for any other kind of business because the underground gas storage tanks are still there and it would be way too expensive for me to remove them safely…

So you say you’re taking these photographs for a book? I bet you’ve found a few more stations like this!

Former Station Owner
Torregrossa, Lleida, November 2016

 

XAVIER ARAGONÈS

Xavier Aragonès (b. 1979) is an amateur photographer living in Terrassa, Spain. His main area of interest is the landscape, either natural or man-altered. When taking photographs he claims to be drawn to capturing atmosphere and suggesting possible narratives rather than telling a straight story. His first photobook, O.O.O., was published by Camera Infinita on February, 2017.

XAVIERARAGONES.COM

 

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