1969-1977

EXHIBITION BY JULIEN HAIRAULT
23 March – 7 April 2017

2016

Julien Hairault is interested in the traces left by Men around them to communicate, sell, inform, entertain… He explores the roads looking for details and marks of forgotten and abandoned landscapes around us. The matter of his work comes from street corners and on by the roadside: closed shops, disused buildings, empty places, or abandoned constructions of the past. Useful or not, these forgotten signs affect our territory and its landscape. Julien only works with analogue medium format cameras to keep physical tracks of subjects impacted by time.

“1969-1977” is a series that reminds us that unnecessary projects have always existed. In 1969 was built in the French department of Loiret a test strip for a new monorail that was supposed to go between Orléans and Paris. After a fews years of tests including a world speed record around 430km/h, the project was abandoned and the construction disused in 1977.

 

JULIEN HAIRAULT

Born in Western France in 1984, Julien Hairault is a self-taught photographer. He also works as cultural coordinator with high school students, especially about movies.

JULIENHAIRAULT.COM

 

 

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Magazine – Reno by Gaëtan Rossier

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ORDER PRINTED COPY

Special Edition
March 2017
12 photographs
34 pages

Featuring
Gaëtan Rossier (Switzerland)

Printed copy
21×14.8 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding
Euro €13.50

 

RENO

Drive all the way to Reno on the wrong side of the road

Wrong Side of the Road, Blue Valentine (Tom Waits, 1978)

Let’s face it, Reno, Nevada, rarely ranks, or even registers a blip, on most travelers’ radars. Indeed, parts of the city still do seem the sort of place where someone might shoot a man, just to watch him die. The cultural climate also remains mostly conservative, but with a libertarian (and practical) bent that allows for gambling in smoky giant casinos or hiding in the shade of a seedy bar.

I have listened to Tom Waits a lot. In August 2016, I rented a car and drove on the right side of the road to Reno. I took some photographs and I liked it.

 

GAËTAN ROSSIER

Gaëtan Rossier (born 1975) is a Swiss photographer. He studied law at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) and works as a lawyer in the administration (labor law).

Gaëtan Rossier is known for his images of banal scenes and objects in different countries (United States, France, Spain, Switzerland, etc…) and for his use of color in photography. Gaëtan Rossier was interested in photography from an early age. Self-taught, he received an Kodak Instamtic at age six. He began to use a 35mm camera ten years later and made his first color photographs. Gaëtan Rossier photography is rooted in the tradition of William Eggleston, Alec Soth and Stephen Shore. Gaëtan, an avid traveler, spent five years working his way down the American North West and documenting the places and people he saw with film cameras and various gears. Rossier’s photography has been exhibited on a collective exhibition in Lyon (France), “Kiss & Fly”. He has also been published in various collective projects.

GAETANROSSIER.CH

 


 


COLLECTOR’S EDITIONS

Two of the photographs found in this issue of Camera Infinita Magazine Special Edition are available to order as a Limited Editions prints for Collectors. These contemporary photographic artworks are curated and sold exclusively online by Camera Infinita. To order, simply click on any of the photos below.
 

ORDER PHOTO PRINTS

 
There are 3 print sizes available:

  • Small: 30×21.4cm, limited to 10 editions
  • Medium: 40x28cm, limited to 5 editions
  • Large: 90×61.4cm, limited to 3 editions

All our gallery-grade prints are accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity, identifying the edition particulars: edition number, size, medium and production date. The Certificate is signed by the artist.

We have partnered with The Print Space, the famous and trusted professional photo lab, based in London, England. Prints are dispatched within 48 hours, and delivered to the desired address worldwide. To guarantee the prints arrive in perfect condition, they are carefully rolled into a protective tube, cushioned with protective paper and bubble wrap, and secured at both ends to ensure a tight and safe seal.

These Collector’s Editions are printed using the following professional archival quality process:

  • Digital C-type
    Chromogenic print. Silver based real photographic prints. Continuous tone.
    Fuji Matt papers. ZBE Chromira printers.

 

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Picture of Health

EXHIBITION BY ANDY FELTHAM
16 – 31 March 2017

2016

The NHS will last as long as there are folk left with the faith to fight for it.

Aneurin Bevan
Health Minister who created the NHS

Since it’s inception in 1948, the National Health Service has been the prized jewel in Britains welfare crown. As mortality rates decrease year-on-year, the demand for cutting-edge therapies, and their associated tariffs, continues to rise. A victim of its own success, the NHS faces it’s biggest fight to date.

Between February and June 2016 I was granted access to all areas across Northampton General Hospital, where I have worked as a nurse for over a decade. The organisation is a mid-sized district general hospital in which small miracles happen on a daily basis. It is the aim of this series to evidence chronic underfunding across the NHS, and consequently that the provision of safe care to the populace of Northamptonshire is becoming increasingly difficult.

“Picture of Health” is my take on a small corner of the UK’s National Health Service today. These are the spaces in which all aspects of healthcare at Northampton General Hospital are delivered, from birth until death.

 

ANDY FELTHAM

Andy Feltham is a self-taught photographer who lives in Northampton, UK, who also works part-time within the healthcare setting at his local hospital. He has been exhibited in the UK and Italy and featured in numerous publications, both online and in print. He has also been commissioned to work in the commercial as well as the fine art setting.

Feltham seeks to create a tension within each photograph by using meticulous framing, exposure and technique to detach the subject from its surroundings. This lends a subtle disquiet to the underlying themes of beauty, mortality and humour that hallmark his work.

ANDYFELTHAMPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

 

 

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Incidental View

PHOTOBOOK BY ANDY FELTHAM

[click cover to preview photobook]

2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

60 photographs
86 pages
29.7×21 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €30.00

BUY NOW

 

in·ci·den·tal

/ɪnsɪˈdɛntəl/

adjective

1. happening in connection with or resulting from something more important; casual or fortuitous
2. (postpositive; foll by to) found in connection (with); related (to)
3. (postpositive; foll by upon) caused (by)
4. occasional or minor ⇒ incidental expenses

noun

5. (often plural) an incidental or minor expense, event, or action

in Collins English Dictionary.

 

ANDY FELTHAM

Andy Feltham is a self-taught photographer who lives in Northampton, UK, who also works part-time within the healthcare setting at his local hospital. He has been exhibited in the UK and Italy and featured in numerous publications, both online and in print. He has also been commissioned to work in the commercial as well as the fine art setting.

Feltham seeks to create a tension within each photograph by using meticulous framing, exposure and technique to detach the subject from its surroundings. This lends a subtle disquiet to the underlying themes of beauty, mortality and humour that hallmark his work.

ANDYFELTHAMPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

 

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An Aesthetic of Everyday Life

EXHIBITION BY JUNYA SUZUKI
8 – 22 March 2017

2013-ongoing

Since ancient times, the Japanese have had a unique aesthetic sense referred to as “wabi-sabi”. Generally, this style prefers the mundane over the showy, quietude over eloquence, and stillness over movement. However, almost no opportunity to hear about the style exists in modern times. As time goes by, and as people become more and more superficial, they have lost touch with their aesthetic sense. One day, I found a common point in photos I captured. That’s the quietness.

I may unconsciously feel an aesthetic sense like “wabi-sabi” in the environment which keeps creating, destroying and changing all the time. Nothing is permanent in this world. And we know life is not endless. That’s why I suspect that we can have a feeling of existing together in harmony. This series is a documentary that seeks for feeling in everyday life.

 

JUNYA SUZUKI

Junya Suzuki, born in Japan in 1979, began taking photographs in 2009. He is a street photographer based in Kanagawa and Tokyo, Japan. His interest focuses on how picture elements connect at the same place at the same time. The faces may have turned to the same direction, or may have turned to a different direction. However, the connections in their emotions fill the space as an attractive photograph. He continues shooting to pursue a goal to document real facts of daily life, adding his own expression of surrealism, lyrics, and humour

JUNYA-SUZUKI.COM

 

 

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Magazine #1

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ORDER PRINTED COPY

Drive Me Baby
March 2017
71 photographs
100 pages

Featuring
Guillaume Abgrall (France)
José De Almeida (Portugal)
Xavier Aragonès (Spain)
Benoît Chailleux (France)
Isa Gelb (France)
Stéphane Goin (France)
Markus Henttonen (Finland)
Dara McGrath (Ireland)
Alex Muriana (Spain)
Gaëtan Rossier (Switzerland)
Sinziana Velicescu (United States of America)
Cyrille Weiner (France)

Printed copy
21×29.7 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding
Euro €30.00

 

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America

EXHIBITION BY CARL GUNHOUSE
1 – 15 March 2017

2008 – 2012

Driving around America for the last six years trying to cover as much of it as I could, going from one political hotspot to the next, from the BP oil spill to Detroit, which is actively depopulating its outer neighborhoods, one thing has been clear. Politics is entertainment; politicians and the press create a constant hysteria of the now, feeding a grand worldwide Greek drama, with real people, if not our own fortunes, in the balance. Like any good soap opera, there are no plot resolutions, nothing is ever truly solved. What’s left is a series of semi-satisfying plot points that are quickly forgotten in the buildup to the next cliffhanger and a never-ending series of monetary distractions that have little effect on our day-to-day lives.

Lax regulations on banking policy caused the economy to implode in 2008, creating a downturn second only to the Great Depression. The calamity was days from throwing the world economy into chaos and has since destabilized European governments and caused domestic unemployment to hit highs not seen in thirty years. Yet five years later there is no interest in substantial banking oversight and the most pressing political issues are federal deficit policy and the pay of public sector unions. This is a disconnect that makes it hard to believe that those writing the plot care if anyone is paying attention. The only people who seem to recognize these issues as distractions are those writing our history (and then only when everyone involved is out of office and retired). History slowly comes to the truth the way beach erosion or glaciers melting bring about a slow-moving change that is constant yet nearly imperceptible.

This listless pace leaves us helpless to affect much of anything that isn’t on a very personal scale. Presidential memoirs are littered with the realization that even the most powerful person in the world has little ability to overcome the slow-moving pace of large political issues. What can we do but work as best we can to understand the events as they happen and hope that the choices we make in our lives will be the right ones? Hopefully, in some marginal way, this will change things for the better.

When things do inevitably change, they tend to sneak up on us as pleasant little surprises where all of a sudden we have an African-American president, gay marriage and a national healthcare program. By the time these once-monumental shifts take place, they seem self-evident. Why shouldn’t African Americans and homosexuals have equal rights? And why shouldn’t we pool all our resources to purchase healthcare? It is only with a good deal of reflection that it becomes clear how slow-moving history is and how long it takes for beliefs to change and how much better our lives have become because of it.

 

CARL GUNHOUSE

Carl Gunhouse was born in 1976 in Boston, Massachusetts, but he spent his formative years in suburban New Jersey. Growing up, he developed a love/hate relationship with suburbia that led to the angst familiar to most suburban youth. With this unrest came the discovery of the anger and DIY ethics of hardcore punk rock. Yearning to be part of the hardcore scene, he started photographing bands, which began his love of photography.

To escape suburban New Jersey, Carl enrolled at Fordham University in New York City. While completing a BA in European History at Fordham, he discovered that photography could be something to pursue a career so he decided to simultaneously complete a BFA in Photography. After going on to earn his MA in American History from Fordham, Carl concentrated on street photography. In hopes of developing and refining his photography work, Carl completed his MFA in Photography at Yale University.

Since graduating, he has found a great deal of personal satisfaction teaching as an Adjunct at Montclair State University, Cooper Union, Marymount Manhattan College, and Nassau Community College. He has also gained some renown for his straightforward writing on photography for such web sites as Searching For the Light, Lay Flat, and American Suburb X. His photography has been shown nationally and internationally. As an artist, he has produced a body of landscape and portrait photographs by driving around the United States to expose the little visual bits of America that give voice to our shared history and experience. Carl currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

CARLGUNHOUSEPHOTO.COM

 

 

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America

PHOTOBOOK BY CARL GUNHOUSE


[click cover to preview photobook]

2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

45 photographs
56 pages
21×21 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €22.50

BUY NOW

 

Driving around America for the last six years trying to cover as much of it as I could, going from one political hotspot to the next, from the BP oil spill to Detroit, which is actively depopulating its outer neighborhoods, one thing has been clear. Politics is entertainment; politicians and the press create a constant hysteria of the now, feeding a grand worldwide Greek drama, with real people, if not our own fortunes, in the balance. Like any good soap opera, there are no plot resolutions, nothing is ever truly solved. What’s left is a series of semi-satisfying plot points that are quickly forgotten in the buildup to the next cliffhanger and a never-ending series of monetary distractions that have little effect on our day-to-day lives.

Lax regulations on banking policy caused the economy to implode in 2008, creating a downturn second only to the Great Depression. The calamity was days from throwing the world economy into chaos and has since destabilized European governments and caused domestic unemployment to hit highs not seen in thirty years. Yet five years later there is no interest in substantial banking oversight and the most pressing political issues are federal deficit policy and the pay of public sector unions. This is a disconnect that makes it hard to believe that those writing the plot care if anyone is paying attention. The only people who seem to recognize these issues as distractions are those writing our history (and then only when everyone involved is out of office and retired). History slowly comes to the truth the way beach erosion or glaciers melting bring about a slow-moving change that is constant yet nearly imperceptible.

This listless pace leaves us helpless to affect much of anything that isn’t on a very personal scale. Presidential memoirs are littered with the realization that even the most powerful person in the world has little ability to overcome the slow-moving pace of large political issues. What can we do but work as best we can to understand the events as they happen and hope that the choices we make in our lives will be the right ones? Hopefully, in some marginal way, this will change things for the better.

When things do inevitably change, they tend to sneak up on us as pleasant little surprises where all of a sudden we have an African-American president, gay marriage and a national healthcare program. By the time these once-monumental shifts take place, they seem self-evident. Why shouldn’t African Americans and homosexuals have equal rights? And why shouldn’t we pool all our resources to purchase healthcare? It is only with a good deal of reflection that it becomes clear how slow-moving history is and how long it takes for beliefs to change and how much better our lives have become because of it.

 

CARL GUNHOUSE

Carl Gunhouse was born in 1976 in Boston, Massachusetts, but he spent his formative years in suburban New Jersey. Growing up, he developed a love/hate relationship with suburbia that led to the angst familiar to most suburban youth. With this unrest came the discovery of the anger and DIY ethics of hardcore punk rock. Yearning to be part of the hardcore scene, he started photographing bands, which began his love of photography.

To escape suburban New Jersey, Carl enrolled at Fordham University in New York City. While completing a BA in European History at Fordham, he discovered that photography could be something to pursue a career so he decided to simultaneously complete a BFA in Photography. After going on to earn his MA in American History from Fordham, Carl concentrated on street photography. In hopes of developing and refining his photography work, Carl completed his MFA in Photography at Yale University.

Since graduating, he has found a great deal of personal satisfaction teaching as an Adjunct at Montclair State University, Cooper Union, Marymount Manhattan College, and Nassau Community College. He has also gained some renown for his straightforward writing on photography for such web sites as Searching For the Light, Lay Flat, and American Suburb X. His photography has been shown nationally and internationally. As an artist, he has produced a body of landscape and portrait photographs by driving around the United States to expose the little visual bits of America that give voice to our shared history and experience. Carl currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

CARLGUNHOUSEPHOTO.COM

 

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The Best 12 Photos of February 2017

Done in close collaboration with Camera Leaks – a leading Tumblr blog dedicated exclusively to photography. With more than 1,200 followers and more than 12,000 posts it’s the daily source for contemporary photography, both for the works of emerging and established artists.

In the beginning of each month Camera Infinita picks the best 12 photos (like good old 12-exposure film rolls) posted the month before on Camera Leaks . The result is outstanding, as it comes from the following photographers:

Amy Harrity
Benoît Chailleux
Gaëtan Rossier
Josef Hoflehner
Larry Niehues
Magnus Åström

Nick Williams
Peter Mandelkow
Rob Stephenson
Stéphane Goin
Tom Westbury
Wim Wenders

 

FEATURED PHOTO
© Wim Wenders

 

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Images from Kazakhstan

EXHIBITION BY GIANFRANCO GALLUCCI
23 February – 7 March 2017

2014-ongoing

These photographs were taken in Kazakhstan on April 2014, upon an invite by the Foundation of the First President of the Republic of Kazakhstan to work on a documentary project in the South. I took pictures of people and places, without any intention to follow a specific story, just focusing on the visible contrast of modern Kazakhstan.

Traveling from Alma-Ata to the city of Turkestan, the landscape is extremely variable, completely different from the places I’m usually used to. I continue to look outside the window. On the trip that will last 16 hours by car, I will not be able to stop often. At a service area along the motorway I find some travelers who get off of an old bus, to stretch their legs and have a drink. On this journey, I will visit one of the oldest and most remote areas of Kazakhstan, rich in archaeological sites, places of worship and pilgrimage sites.

I reach the ruins of Otrar, an ancient urban site currently a place of an archaeological dig, where workers and archaeologists are involved in the work of recovering what has been buried by earth and time. I go to visit the mausoleum of Arystan – baba, a site of pilgrimage from all over Asia; a place immersed in a land that is lost to the eye towards the horizon, from which stand a few buildings: the old mausoleum, the new white mosque and its adjacent buildings, the sunset-backed profile of the tombs in the surrounding cemetery. On the next step I reach the famous place of worship. Also a great tourist attraction for its historical, cultural and spiritual value, the massive presence of the Mausoleum of Khodja Akhmed Yassaui stands on the very flat horizon of its surrounding territory. In the gardens of the same mausoleum, tourists used to take family pictures, or would get on a camel for a few Tenge, the local currency. I leave the site of the mausoleum to move to the old bazaar in the city of Turkestan, full of people, vendors and local merchandise.

In the late afternoon, I visit the historic ex-soviet railway station, where on the first platform I find a large number of small shops that sell any kind of drink, food or object to travellers. The next day I reach another archaeological site, Sauran, an ancient city dated back to thousands of years ago and destroyed about a thousand years ago. The ruins, currently reduced to the bone, with the exception of the perimeter walls which are still well visible, are immersed in a barren and dusty land, giving you the impression of being almost in the desert. I go back to the city, abandoning for a while the steppes, where on the street I see many old cars, mostly Lada, off-road vehicles and pictures of the president of Kazakhstan.

After travelling back, I am in Alma-Ata again with the memory on my mind of a place so remote and different, not only for me but also for the people from here, accustomed to modernity and contemporaneity of a cosmopolitan city pointed to the future, which contrasts with a zone of Kazakhstan still tied to the past and historical traditions of its wide Country.

 

GIANFRANCO GALLUCCI

Gianfranco Gallucci (b.1981) is an independent documentary photographer based in Rome. He works mainly getting involved in long term projects focused on landscape, social and cultural issues, exploring the relationship between us and the places we live.

Graduated in Architecture at the University of Ferrara in 2008, with a research thesis on photography and urban system analysis, titled «Introducing Photography – PHOTO (+) DATA / backup – A feedback for the contemporary city», curated by Vittorio Savi. He started approaching photography as a self-taught photographer in 2004, after independent studies on cinematography, while majoring in architecture at university.

In 2009 got an internship at Agence VU in Paris. The following year, he moved to Rome where he got a master in photojournalism at ISFCI and attended workshops with photographers like Patrick Zachmann, Davide Monteleone, Christina Garcia Rodero and others.

In 2013 took part to «Naked City Project» campaign on the city of Rome, and «Confotografia», a residency – documentary campaign on the territories of L’Aquila, the italian city devasted by the earthquake in 2009. In 2014 was invited by The Foundation of the First President of the Republic of Kazakhstan to work on a documentary project in the most remote areas of the South.

His work has been published on italian and foreign magazines such as La Repubblica, Taz Berliner Zeitung, Brand Eins, Mitbestimmung, Territorio, National Geographic Italia, Domusweb, Urbanautica, among others, and exhibited in several institutions including Triennale di Milano and MACRO Museum in Rome.

He is a United Nations accredited photojournalist.

GIANFRANCOGALLUCCI.COM

 

 

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