Connecting Flows

PHOTOBOOK BY DOMINA APOSTOLIDOU


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

69 photographs
104 pages
21×29.7 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €34.50

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When I started taking these pictures about 2 years ago, I did not have a specific project in mind. I just tried to capture things that felt relevant to me in some way. As time has passed this body of work feels more coherent to my eyes. The notion of a “natural flow”, of an inner connection with the world, that I experience whilst making photographs, seems to be expressed in my pictures as well. Although the subjects are various and the places are different, I seem to always look for the same inner space, where these feelings are present. This is why I call this body of work “Connecting Flows”. For me, the place where these natural flows connect is a place where magic happens.

I see a lot of photography and sincerely enjoy the work of many photographers, but my influences can come from any kind of art, nature or from other people. A look, a real moment with someone you know or don’t know, this precious intimacy… it can all be very influential to me. Being open to life. That is what motivates my work.

 

DOMINA APOSTOLIDOU

I was born in 1975 in Greece. I have studied civil engineering, and I work as an engineer. Photography entered my life in 2011. Since then, not a day has passed without photographs, in one way or another. I love stories, I love pictures.

DOMINAAPOSTOLIDOU.COM

 

 

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Connecting Flows

DOMINA APOSTOLIDOU
16 – 30 November 2017

2015 – 2017

When I started taking these pictures about 2 years ago, I did not have a specific project in mind. I just tried to capture things that felt relevant to me in some way. As time has passed this body of work feels more coherent to my eyes. The notion of a “natural flow”, of an inner connection with the world, that I experience whilst making photographs, seems to be expressed in my pictures as well. Although the subjects are various and the places are different, I seem to always look for the same inner space, where these feelings are present. This is why I call this body of work “Connecting Flows”. For me, the place where these natural flows connect is a place where magic happens.

I see a lot of photography and sincerely enjoy the work of many photographers, but my influences can come from any kind of art, nature or from other people. A look, a real moment with someone you know or don’t know, this precious intimacy… it can all be very influential to me. Being open to life. That is what motivates my work.

 

DOMINA APOSTOLIDOU

I was born in 1975 in Greece. I have studied civil engineering, and I work as an engineer. Photography entered my life in 2011. Since then, not a day has passed without photographs, in one way or another. I love stories, I love pictures.

DOMINAAPOSTOLIDOU.COM

 

 

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Magazine #5

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There’s Something Behind Those Trees
November 2017
71 photographs
102 pages

Featuring
José De Almeida (Portugal)
Domina Apostolidou (Greece)
Xavier Aragonès (Spain)
Richard Chivers (England)
Barry Falk (England)
Andy Feltham (England)
Stéphane Guillaume (France)
Mitch Karunaratne (England)
Markus Lehr (Germany)
Thieu Riemen (The Netherlands)
Franco Sortini (Italy)
Alessandro Zanoni (Italy)

Printed copy
21×29.7 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding
Euro €30.00

 


 

 

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L’inachevé (The Unfinished)

EXHIBITION BY JULIEN LOMBARDI
8 – 22 November 2017

2012 – 2015

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Armenia has been making the transition between the old order and a new political project that has yet to be achieved. With difficulty, another model is taking shape, one that remains impossible to define, as its form is continually shifting while the hardships facing the country are numerous. Two decades have passed and the country is still evolving on the sidelines, according to its own rules, and in its own time.

Contemporary Armenia is outside the flow of images, and illustrations of this young republic’s development are lacking, absent or even hidden. However, the issues affecting the territory of Armenia are in many ways indicative of the challenges of our time: how to reconstruct after the breakup of a union? How to develop a narrative for this new state without denying its history?

With the reappearance of its borders has come the need for 70 years of regional planning and political and economic organisation to be thought out anew amid conflict and isolation. Vestiges of the soviet era remain in this country of pastoral tradition, where everything goes on without anything definitive coming about. The environment is changing, but the present is sidestepped through the people’s aspirations for a more promising future.

Image by image, L’inachevé provides a visual investigation within a land immersed in waiting, as if in suspension. The captured spaces have the poetry of the unaccomplished, even unresolved, and they reflect an environment in search of a new definition. They comprise the scenery of a play that is to be performed, but according to uncertain timing. Rather than documenting the current situation, these photographs are directed towards history that has yet to be made and its prospects for renewal.

Through the demonstration of a theatrical dimension of reality, they question the possibilities of revival for this young republic, which is inexorably being emptied of its inhabitants. In this context, space becomes the mirror of a people’s struggle to recover their territory, and can be seen in the photographs of L’inachevé as bearing witness to memory in the course of its taking form.

 

JULIEN LOMBARDI

Having graduated with a Masters in Ethnology, Julien Lombardi is an artist who uses photography as a tool of field research and visual investigation.

His work gained widespread exposure when he was awarded the Bourse du Talent in 2009 for his series Artefact. This work of nocturnal exploration probes rural space and is based on a collection of objects freed from their utility. Several prints from this series are included in private and public collections (BNF, Artothèque Départementale du Lot, Pôle photographique Le Château d’Eau).

Since then, his work has been exhibited regularly in galleries, festivals and art centres in France and abroad. The series Dérive, created in 2010, deals with the concepts of décor and artifice and shows the city as a scenographic space without use. Presented at Photo España, the Salon Jeune Création and Festival Itinéraires des Photographes Voyageurs, this work has also been exhibited in the gallery See Studio and the gallery Djeziri-bonn / Linard editions.

In 2013, Julien Lombardi participated in Art-o-rama, International Fair of Contemporary Art with his series Processing Landscape, which questions the making of images without references to reality. He completed this research in 2014 by exhibiting at the gallery Lhoste Art Contemporain in Arles, then at the Centre d’Art Contemporain Photographique in Niort in 2016.

Between 2012 and 2015, he began a project of documentary research in Armenia in the context of Hors Les Murs, the residency programme of the Institut Français. In this work, he explores the theme of the unfinished to deal with this young republic in the course of its formation. The series L’inachevé [Unfinished] was awarded the Marco Pesaresi Award in 2015, and then the Kaunas Photo Star Award and Prix Maison Blanche in 2016. It has been the subject of numerous publications (Spiegel Online, The Eyes #6, Il Post, Aint-bad Magazine, The Calvert Journal, Paper Journal) and was exhibited in 2016 at Festival Circulation(s), the Athens Photo Festival and Krakow Photomonth. In 2017, L’inachevé is to be published by Le Bec en l’Air editions.

His most recent work, EgoTour, analyses the impact of the tourism industry on our societies and our representations of elsewhere, by investigating the site of the Giza Pyramids. This work was exhibited for the first time at the gallery Lhoste Art Contemporain during the 2016 Rencontres d’Arles and is to be shown soon at Topographie de l’Art in Paris, alongside works by Joan Fontcuberta, Alain Fleischer, Laurent Millet and Eric Rondepierre.

JULIENLOMBARDI.COM

 

 

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The World Knows Us, Because We Kill Lions

PHOTOBOOK BY ADRIEN BLONDEL


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

40 photographs
72 pages
21×29.7 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €28.50

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The Last Maasais

When out of their territories, Maasais identify each other through little details on the person, often times a bead bracelet or a missing front tooth. These serve as a form of identification, and can be seen as a beacon in a country where they find themselves the minority and see their land ownership being more and more contested.

Namuncha is a Maasai community in Kenya, it is located at the edge of the Maasai territory, and its members sometimes refer to themselves as the last Maasais. This little joke has a bitter sweet taste, bearing the ominous prophecy of their disappearance, the relegation of their traditions to something solely picturesque.

I first spent some time in Namuncha eight years ago, to provide images to serve for their increasing desire to welcome tourists in the community and participate in the country’s first economy. I gathered some footage and photographs. I went back in 2016 with the purpose to create a multimedia project including a feature length documentary and a photographic story. The aim of this project is to provide representation for the ordinary, the everyday, among a radically different culture, culture that is known in the world for its colorful and exotic traditions.

My project deals with the mundanities of Maasai life, with a culture that is shaped around their own concept of time. They are a chanting people living a quiet life, a fleeting culture under the pressure of globalization. The apparent peacefulness bears the presence of a struggle, a struggle rooted in history, culture and economics, a silent ongoing threat.

 

ADRIEN BLONDEL

Adrien Blondel was born and grew up in Normandy, France. He moved to Paris where he studied and graduated in history of cinema and cinematography. His first feature documentary film project brought him to the US, where he came back to live in San Francisco. Adrien works as a lighting technician and a camera operator for the film industry. He recently finished the shooting of his second feature documentary, set in a Maasai community in Kenya.

In search for more creative output than his work provides, Adrien started developing his photography practice a few years ago. His work is highly influenced by the experience of living abroad, and deals with memory, the notion of home and a cultural view of his surroundings.

ADRIENBLONDELPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

 

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The World Knows Us, Because We Kill Lions

EXHIBITION BY ADRIEN BLONDEL
1 – 15 November 2017

2016

The Last Maasais

When out of their territories, Maasais identify each other through little details on the person, often times a bead bracelet or a missing front tooth. These serve as a form of identification, and can be seen as a beacon in a country where they find themselves the minority and see their land ownership being more and more contested.

Namuncha is a Maasai community in Kenya, it is located at the edge of the Maasai territory, and its members sometimes refer to themselves as the last Maasais. This little joke has a bitter sweet taste, bearing the ominous prophecy of their disappearance, the relegation of their traditions to something solely picturesque.

I first spent some time in Namuncha eight years ago, to provide images to serve for their increasing desire to welcome tourists in the community and participate in the country’s first economy. I gathered some footage and photographs. I went back in 2016 with the purpose to create a multimedia project including a feature length documentary and a photographic story. The aim of this project is to provide representation for the ordinary, the everyday, among a radically different culture, culture that is known in the world for its colorful and exotic traditions.

My project deals with the mundanities of Maasai life, with a culture that is shaped around their own concept of time. They are a chanting people living a quiet life, a fleeting culture under the pressure of globalization. The apparent peacefulness bears the presence of a struggle, a struggle rooted in history, culture and economics, a silent ongoing threat.

 

ADRIEN BLONDEL

Adrien Blondel was born and grew up in Normandy, France. He moved to Paris where he studied and graduated in history of cinema and cinematography. His first feature documentary film project brought him to the US, where he came back to live in San Francisco. Adrien works as a lighting technician and a camera operator for the film industry. He recently finished the shooting of his second feature documentary, set in a Maasai community in Kenya.

In search for more creative output than his work provides, Adrien started developing his photography practice a few years ago. His work is highly influenced by the experience of living abroad, and deals with memory, the notion of home and a cultural view of his surroundings.

ADRIENBLONDELPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

 

 

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Magazine – The Other Side by Thieu Riemen

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Special Edition
October 2017
12 photographs
34 pages

Featuring
Thieu Riemen (The Netherlands)

Printed copy
21×14.8 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding
Euro €13.50

 

THE OTHER SIDE

As a child, when embarking on holidays to the Mediterranean, we often passed through Liège (Luik in Dutch).

A gloomy city with a lot of heavy industry and smoking chimneys, most who visit hope to traverse the city as quickly as possible to arrive in more picturesque regions. Gazing through the windows of the car, I was fascinated by the otherworldly sights. Otherworldly because there could not be a greater contrast with the Dutch cities I knew at that time. My home town of Tilburg was clean and looked very well organized in comparison with that messy French speaking city. Only 20 miles from the Dutch speaking and well-ordered Maastricht, there was a whole new world to explore.

In my youth the steel and other heavy industries of Liège were already in a state of malaise. The long economic downturn is (still) very visible in the form of abandoned factory complexes and dilapidated working-class neighbourhoods.

In the years from 2008 to 2011 I went on a lot of walks in Seraing, one of the industrial suburbs of Liège. The images, made during these walks, explore the cultural landscape of this area, presenting residential areas as well as industrial sites.

 

THIEU RIEMEN

Thieu Riemen (b. 1958) is a fine-art photographer and teacher who lives in Tilburg in the south of The Netherlands. Originally he was educated as a painter at Academie voor Beeldende Vorming Tilburg (Academy of Visual Arts) and art historian at Leiden University. Photography was continuously a part of his visual artwork and profession. About eight years ago, the rise of digital photography gave a fresh new boost to his landscape photography.

THIEURIEMEN.NL

 


 


COLLECTOR’S EDITIONS

Two of the photographs found in this issue of Camera Infinita Magazine Special Edition are available to order as a Limited Editions prints for Collectors. These contemporary photographic artworks are curated and sold exclusively online by Camera Infinita. To order, simply click on any of the photos below.

 

ORDER PHOTO PRINTS

 
There are 3 print sizes available:

  • eXtra Small: 20×14.6cm, limited to 20 editions
  • Small: 30×21.3cm, limited to 10 editions
  • Medium: 40x28cm, limited to 5 editions

All our gallery-grade prints are accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity, identifying the edition particulars: edition number, size, medium and production date. The Certificate is signed by the artist.

We have partnered with The Print Space, the famous and trusted professional photo lab, based in London, England. Prints are dispatched within 48 hours, and delivered to the desired address worldwide. To guarantee the prints arrive in perfect condition, they are carefully rolled into a protective tube, cushioned with protective paper and bubble wrap, and secured at both ends to ensure a tight and safe seal.

These Collector’s Editions are printed using the following professional archival quality process:

  • Digital C-type
    Chromogenic print. Silver based real photographic prints. Continuous tone.
    Fuji Matt papers. ZBE Chromira printers.

 

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Lost in Tunis

EXHIBITION BY CLAUDIA CORRENT
23 October – 7 November 2017

2016

 

CLAUDIA CORRENT

Claudia Corrent (b. in 1980) is a freelance photographer based in Bolzano, Italy. 
After a graduation in Philosophy at the University of Trento, she approached photography through several workshops and courses. Her work was exhibited in Milan, Rome, San Francisco, Genoa.. Her images have been published in , Der Spiegel, Courrier International, Il Post, Corriere della Sera. She’s interested in storytelling especially related to anthropological and social issues and the relationship between people and the environment. She is represented by LUZphoto.

CLAUDIACORRENT.CARBONMADE.COM

 

 

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Wuhan Boulevard

PHOTOBOOK BY ALESSANDRO ZANONI


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2017 / 1st edition
Limited of 100

36 photographs
86 pages
29.7×21 cm
Hardcover, perfect binding

Euro €32.50

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Wuhan Boulevard is an invitation to a journey through a city in progress where time stands still. A journey through an elevated urban railway located in the capital of Hubei province traversed by the Yangtze River: Wuhan. Consciously or unconsciously, deliberately or unthinkingly, the focus on a specific mode of transportation is of particular interest. Wuhan is indeed a major transport and logistic hub connecting key provinces in China, notably thanks to its port. Yet the usual watery landscapes that surround the city are not the focal point of this visual journey. Wuhan Boulevard is in truth one of the stops of the metro line one Zanoni has used to travel across the city. Immediately struck by this appellation, the artist chooses it while thumbing his nose at the fantasy about the Western famous boulevards, such as the Sunset Boulevard: the legendary route to fame and success in Los Angeles. But here the glamour and the density have turned into a rather unsettling and abandoned urban environment. Here we embark on a train that leads to an infinite landscape made of concrete and empty skyscrapers, an endless road towards unceasing urbanization.

Wuhan Boulevard seizes non-places, in other words transitional spaces which are supposed to be crossed. Probing into social commentary, the series reifies the notion of unqualified city. It allows us to look behind giant advertising panels, unveiling a dreamt city struggling to be completed, a city made of brand-new skycrapers that cohabit with old crumbling housing, a city built to welcome more inhabitants while excluding others. In fact Wuhan is the most populous city in Central China, but it seems its inhabitants have been discarded from these photographs. Where are the people? Only a lone wanderer here and there, or some cloths hung outside testify to the human presence. What is left of their houses then? Are they under construction or being knocked down? Zanoni’s pictures unveil an anxiety about modernization. A sense of dehumanization, of alienation, while enhancing at the same time local attempts to take over these non-places.

Zanoni does not only document what contemporary Chinese metropolises are made of today. He embraces the role of the urban flâneur by exploring the ways in which inhabitants can move or are prevented from moving across their environment. Zanoni climbs up the ground hills, cuts across rubbish mounds, wanders around forbidden construction areas, while gazing from above on the elevated railway. As an attempt to depict a city on the move populated with people on the move, these photographs reinforce the fact that paths are alternatively opened and obstructed.

In sum Wuhan Boulevard intertwines the notions of order with disorder, hope with disillusion, leftover past with uncertain future. It caught a glimpse of Chinese urban life as the train is passing by.

Marine Cabos
Art historian – Photography of China

 

ALESSANDRO ZANONI

He’s a visual designer and photographer based in Milan, Italy. After attending Fine Art School and taking courses in illustration at the European Design Institute of Milan, he began his profession as a graphic designer, first in the field of printing and publishing and subsequently in web and interaction design. A devourer of music he worked for a decade writing reviews for the influential rock magazine Jam. He recently began his approach to photography obtaining important awards at the IPA’s and Sony World Photography Awards. He have exhibited in both solo and group shows in Milan, Naples Paris and New York. A tireless metropolitan traveler, his work is focused on finding unusual and urban wastelands: the quest of human footprint in the anthropocene era captured through the lens of his sleek yet detached gaze.

ALESSANDROZANONI.COM

 

 

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Wuhan Boulevard

EXHIBITION BY ALESSANDRO ZANONI
16 – 31 October 2017

2016

Wuhan Boulevard is an invitation to a journey through a city in progress where time stands still. A journey through an elevated urban railway located in the capital of Hubei province traversed by the Yangtze River: Wuhan. Consciously or unconsciously, deliberately or unthinkingly, the focus on a specific mode of transportation is of particular interest. Wuhan is indeed a major transport and logistic hub connecting key provinces in China, notably thanks to its port. Yet the usual watery landscapes that surround the city are not the focal point of this visual journey. Wuhan Boulevard is in truth one of the stops of the metro line one Zanoni has used to travel across the city. Immediately struck by this appellation, the artist chooses it while thumbing his nose at the fantasy about the Western famous boulevards, such as the Sunset Boulevard: the legendary route to fame and success in Los Angeles. But here the glamour and the density have turned into a rather unsettling and abandoned urban environment. Here we embark on a train that leads to an infinite landscape made of concrete and empty skyscrapers, an endless road towards unceasing urbanization.

Wuhan Boulevard seizes non-places, in other words transitional spaces which are supposed to be crossed. Probing into social commentary, the series reifies the notion of unqualified city. It allows us to look behind giant advertising panels, unveiling a dreamt city struggling to be completed, a city made of brand-new skycrapers that cohabit with old crumbling housing, a city built to welcome more inhabitants while excluding others. In fact Wuhan is the most populous city in Central China, but it seems its inhabitants have been discarded from these photographs. Where are the people? Only a lone wanderer here and there, or some cloths hung outside testify to the human presence. What is left of their houses then? Are they under construction or being knocked down? Zanoni’s pictures unveil an anxiety about modernization. A sense of dehumanization, of alienation, while enhancing at the same time local attempts to take over these non-places.

Zanoni does not only document what contemporary Chinese metropolises are made of today. He embraces the role of the urban flâneur by exploring the ways in which inhabitants can move or are prevented from moving across their environment. Zanoni climbs up the ground hills, cuts across rubbish mounds, wanders around forbidden construction areas, while gazing from above on the elevated railway. As an attempt to depict a city on the move populated with people on the move, these photographs reinforce the fact that paths are alternatively opened and obstructed.

In sum Wuhan Boulevard intertwines the notions of order with disorder, hope with disillusion, leftover past with uncertain future. It caught a glimpse of Chinese urban life as the train is passing by.

Marine Cabos
Art historian – Photography of China

 

ALESSANDRO ZANONI

He’s a visual designer and photographer based in Milan, Italy. After attending Fine Art School and taking courses in illustration at the European Design Institute of Milan, he began his profession as a graphic designer, first in the field of printing and publishing and subsequently in web and interaction design. A devourer of music he worked for a decade writing reviews for the influential rock magazine Jam. He recently began his approach to photography obtaining important awards at the IPA’s and Sony World Photography Awards. He have exhibited in both solo and group shows in Milan, Naples Paris and New York. A tireless metropolitan traveler, his work is focused on finding unusual and urban wastelands: the quest of human footprint in the anthropocene era captured through the lens of his sleek yet detached gaze.

ALESSANDROZANONI.COM

 

 

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